In 2019, approximately 38 million people were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has determined a change in the course of HIV infection, transforming it into a chronic condition which results in cumulative exposure to antiretroviral drugs, inflammatory effects and aging. Relatedly, at least one quarter of HIV-infected patients suffer from cognitive, motor and behavioral disorder, globally known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In this context, objective, neuroimaging-based biomarkers are therefore highly desirable in order to detect, quantify and monitor HAND in all disease stages. In this study, we employed functional MRI in conjunction with graph-theoretical analysis as well as a newly developed functional brain network disruption index to assess a putative functional reorganization in HIV positive patients. We found that brain function of HIV patients is deeply reorganized as compared to normal controls. Interestingly, the regions in which we found reorganized hubs are integrated into neuronal networks involved in working memory, motor and executive functions often altered in patients with HAND. Overall, our study demonstrates that rs-fMRI combined with advanced graph theoretical analysis and disruption indices is able to detect early, subtle functional changes of brain networks in HIV patients before structural changes become evident.

Minosse, S., Picchi, E., Di Giuliano, F., Lanzafame, S., Manenti, G., Pistolese, C., et al. (2020). Disruption of brain network organization in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS (pp.1726-1729). IEEE.

Disruption of brain network organization in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection

Manenti, G;Pistolese, CA;Sarmati, L;Teti, E;Andreoni, M;Floris, R;Guerrisi, M;Garaci, F;Toschi, N
2020-01-01

Abstract

In 2019, approximately 38 million people were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Combined antiretroviral therapy (cART) has determined a change in the course of HIV infection, transforming it into a chronic condition which results in cumulative exposure to antiretroviral drugs, inflammatory effects and aging. Relatedly, at least one quarter of HIV-infected patients suffer from cognitive, motor and behavioral disorder, globally known as HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). In this context, objective, neuroimaging-based biomarkers are therefore highly desirable in order to detect, quantify and monitor HAND in all disease stages. In this study, we employed functional MRI in conjunction with graph-theoretical analysis as well as a newly developed functional brain network disruption index to assess a putative functional reorganization in HIV positive patients. We found that brain function of HIV patients is deeply reorganized as compared to normal controls. Interestingly, the regions in which we found reorganized hubs are integrated into neuronal networks involved in working memory, motor and executive functions often altered in patients with HAND. Overall, our study demonstrates that rs-fMRI combined with advanced graph theoretical analysis and disruption indices is able to detect early, subtle functional changes of brain networks in HIV patients before structural changes become evident.
Annual International Conferences of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBC 2020
Montreal (Canada)
2020
42
Rilevanza internazionale
Settore FIS/07
English
Intervento a convegno
Minosse, S., Picchi, E., Di Giuliano, F., Lanzafame, S., Manenti, G., Pistolese, C., et al. (2020). Disruption of brain network organization in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. In Proceedings of the Annual International Conference of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society, EMBS (pp.1726-1729). IEEE.
Minosse, S; Picchi, E; Di Giuliano, F; Lanzafame, S; Manenti, G; Pistolese, C; Sarmati, L; Teti, E; Andreoni, M; Floris, R; Guerrisi, M; Garaci, F; Toschi, N
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/278384
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