Objective: We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of botulinum A toxin (BTX-A) intravesical injections in patients affected by painful bladder syndrome with increased urinary frequency, refractory to conventional treatment modalities. Methods: Twelve women and two men were prospectively included in the study. Under short general anaesthesia patients were given injections of 200 U of commercially available BTX-A diluted in 20 ml 0.9% NaCl. Injections were performed submucosally in the trigone and bladder floor under cystoscopic control. Voiding chart, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and urodynamics were performed before treatment and 1 and 3 mo afterward. Results: Overall, 12 patients (85.7%) reported subjective improvement at 1 and 3 mo follow-up. The mean VAS score was significantly reduced at 1 and 3 mo after treatment (p < 0.05 for both); at the same time points daytime and nighttime urinary frequency significantly decreased (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), and bladder cystometric capacity significantly increased (p < 0.01). Two patients reported incomplete bladder emptying. We did not detect any systemic side effects during or after treatment. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate that BTX-A intravesical injections are effective in the short-term management of painful bladder syndrome. By modulating afferent C-fiber activity within the bladder walls, BTX-A significantly improves urodynamic parameters and reduces bladder pain and urinary frequency.

Giannantoni, A., Costantini, E., DI STASI, S.m., Tascini, M., Bini, V., Porena, M. (2006). Botulinum A toxin intravesical injections in the treatment of painful bladder syndrome: A pilot study. EUROPEAN UROLOGY, 49(4), 704-709 [10.1016/j.eururo.2005.12.002].

Botulinum A toxin intravesical injections in the treatment of painful bladder syndrome: A pilot study

DI STASI, SAVINO MAURO;
2006-01-01

Abstract

Objective: We evaluated the efficacy and tolerability of botulinum A toxin (BTX-A) intravesical injections in patients affected by painful bladder syndrome with increased urinary frequency, refractory to conventional treatment modalities. Methods: Twelve women and two men were prospectively included in the study. Under short general anaesthesia patients were given injections of 200 U of commercially available BTX-A diluted in 20 ml 0.9% NaCl. Injections were performed submucosally in the trigone and bladder floor under cystoscopic control. Voiding chart, the Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for pain, and urodynamics were performed before treatment and 1 and 3 mo afterward. Results: Overall, 12 patients (85.7%) reported subjective improvement at 1 and 3 mo follow-up. The mean VAS score was significantly reduced at 1 and 3 mo after treatment (p < 0.05 for both); at the same time points daytime and nighttime urinary frequency significantly decreased (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05, respectively), and bladder cystometric capacity significantly increased (p < 0.01). Two patients reported incomplete bladder emptying. We did not detect any systemic side effects during or after treatment. Conclusions: The results of this pilot study indicate that BTX-A intravesical injections are effective in the short-term management of painful bladder syndrome. By modulating afferent C-fiber activity within the bladder walls, BTX-A significantly improves urodynamic parameters and reduces bladder pain and urinary frequency.
2006
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Nessuno
Settore MED/24 - UROLOGIA
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Bladder; Botulinum toxin A; Painful bladder syndrome
Giannantoni, A., Costantini, E., DI STASI, S.m., Tascini, M., Bini, V., Porena, M. (2006). Botulinum A toxin intravesical injections in the treatment of painful bladder syndrome: A pilot study. EUROPEAN UROLOGY, 49(4), 704-709 [10.1016/j.eururo.2005.12.002].
Giannantoni, A; Costantini, E; DI STASI, Sm; Tascini, M; Bini, V; Porena, M
Articolo su rivista
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
EUR_UROL_2006_49_704-709.pdf

accesso aperto

Licenza: Copyright dell'editore
Dimensione 147.11 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
147.11 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/8800
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? 21
  • Scopus 117
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 100
social impact