Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.

Turriziani, M., Fantini, M., Benvenuto, M., Izzi, V., Masuelli, L., Sacchetti, P., et al. (2012). Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials. RECENT PATENTS ON ANTI-CANCER DRUG DISCOVERY, 7(3), 265-296 [10.2174/157489212801820020].

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials

TURRIZIANI, MARIO;MODESTI, ANDREA;BEI, ROBERTO
2012

Abstract

Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), a glycosylated protein of MW 180 kDa, is overexpressed in a wide range of human carcinomas, including colorectal, gastric, pancreatic, non-small cell lung and breast carcinomas. Accordingly, CEA is one of several oncofetal antigens that may serve as a target for active anti-cancer specific immunotherapy. Experimental results obtained by employing animal models have supported the design of clinical trials using a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of different types of human cancers. This review reports findings from experimental models and clinical evidence on the use of a CEA-based vaccine for the treatment of cancer patients. Among the diverse CEA-based cancer vaccines, DCs- and recombinant viruses-based vaccines seem the most valid. However, although vaccination was shown to induce a strong immune response to CEA, resulting in a delay in tumor progression and prolonged survival in some cancer patients, it failed to eradicate the tumor in most cases, owing partly to the negative effect exerted by the tumor microenvironment on immune response. Thus, in order to develop more efficient and effective cancer vaccines, it is necessary to design new clinical trials combining cancer vaccines with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and drugs which target those factors responsible for immunosuppression of immune cells. This review also discusses relevant patents relating to the use of CEA as a cancer vaccine.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/04 - Patologia Generale
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Models, Animal; Animals; Neoplasms; Carcinoembryonic Antigen; Cancer Vaccines; Antineoplastic Agents; Humans; Immunotherapy, Active; Clinical Trials as Topic; Patents as Topic; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical
Turriziani, M., Fantini, M., Benvenuto, M., Izzi, V., Masuelli, L., Sacchetti, P., et al. (2012). Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA)-based cancer vaccines: recent patents and antitumor effects from experimental models to clinical trials. RECENT PATENTS ON ANTI-CANCER DRUG DISCOVERY, 7(3), 265-296 [10.2174/157489212801820020].
Turriziani, M; Fantini, M; Benvenuto, M; Izzi, V; Masuelli, L; Sacchetti, P; Modesti, A; Bei, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/78174
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