Since after the first streptomycin 1944 trials, anti-tuberculous chemotherapy research has been focused upon establishing drug combination regimens capable of overcoming drug resistance and amenable to ambulatory treatment in resource strapped countries. The first milestone being the 1959 Madras trial comparing home and sanatorium treatment in South India. Subsequently, the MRC trials led Fox and Mitchison to indicate rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide as the first line drugs for short course, 6 month, regimens and the 1982 Hong Kong Chest Service trials established intermittent therapy as the ambulatory treatment standard for directly observed therapy (DOT). The rising of the HIV epidemic at the beginning of the 1980s has refuelled tuberculosis spread in Africa and Asia and contributed to the expansion of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide making the development of new drugs and drug regimens for ambulatory treatment a top priority. Led by biotechnological advances, molecular biology has been brought into TB laboratory diagnosis for the highly sensitive and specific rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in biological samples. The field of immunological diagnosis of TB infection, dominated since the early 1900s by the intradermal tuberculin reaction has been put back in motion by the discovery of M. tuberculosis-specific proteins and peptides, now employed in blood tests of high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of latent TB which may help with the identification of contacts at higher risk of active disease and the eradication of pidemic cases. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Saltini, C. (2006). Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis, 100(12), 2085-2097 [10.1016/j.rmed.2006.09.015].

Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis

SALTINI, CESARE
2006-01-01

Abstract

Since after the first streptomycin 1944 trials, anti-tuberculous chemotherapy research has been focused upon establishing drug combination regimens capable of overcoming drug resistance and amenable to ambulatory treatment in resource strapped countries. The first milestone being the 1959 Madras trial comparing home and sanatorium treatment in South India. Subsequently, the MRC trials led Fox and Mitchison to indicate rifampicin, isoniazid and pyrazinamide as the first line drugs for short course, 6 month, regimens and the 1982 Hong Kong Chest Service trials established intermittent therapy as the ambulatory treatment standard for directly observed therapy (DOT). The rising of the HIV epidemic at the beginning of the 1980s has refuelled tuberculosis spread in Africa and Asia and contributed to the expansion of drug-resistant tuberculosis worldwide making the development of new drugs and drug regimens for ambulatory treatment a top priority. Led by biotechnological advances, molecular biology has been brought into TB laboratory diagnosis for the highly sensitive and specific rapid identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in biological samples. The field of immunological diagnosis of TB infection, dominated since the early 1900s by the intradermal tuberculin reaction has been put back in motion by the discovery of M. tuberculosis-specific proteins and peptides, now employed in blood tests of high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of latent TB which may help with the identification of contacts at higher risk of active disease and the eradication of pidemic cases. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Sì, ma tipo non specificato
Settore MED/10 - Malattie dell'Apparato Respiratorio
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Clinical trials; MDR-TB; TB chemotherapy; TB in vitro T-cell assays; TB molecular diagnosis
aminoglycoside; aminosalicylic acid; bacterial DNA; bacterial protein; ciprofloxacin; cycloserine; ethambutol; ethionamide; isoniazid; kanamycin; levofloxacin; ofloxacin; pyrazinamide; rifampicin; rifamycin; rifapentine; streptomycin; thioacetazone; tuberculostatic agent; Africa; antibiotic resistance; article; Asia; bacterial transmission; bacterium identification; biotechnology; clinical trial; directly observed therapy; drug cost; drug intermittent therapy; drug potentiation; drug research; epidemic; gastrointestinal symptom; home care; human; Human immunodeficiency virus infection; laboratory diagnosis; lung tuberculosis; molecular biology; multidrug resistance; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; outpatient care; priority journal; resource management; sensitivity and specificity; serodiagnosis; short course therapy; skin toxicity; tuberculin test; vestibular disorder; Ambulatory Care; Antibiotics, Antitubercular; Antibodies, Bacterial; Antitubercular Agents; Disease Outbreaks; Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial; History, 20th Century; HIV Infections; Humans; Hypersensitivity, Delayed; Mycobacterium tuberculosis; Nucleic Acid Amplification Techniques; Rifampin; Tuberculosis
Saltini, C. (2006). Chemotherapy and diagnosis of tuberculosis, 100(12), 2085-2097 [10.1016/j.rmed.2006.09.015].
Saltini, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/56958
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