Carbon nanotubes possess unique chemical, physical, optical, and magnetic properties, which make them suitable for many uses in industrial products and in the field of nanotechnology, including nanomedicine. We describe fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Then we describe recent results on the issue of cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes obtained in our labs. Silica nanoparticles have been widely used for biosensing and catalytic applications due to their large surface area-to-volume ratio, straightforward manufacture, and the compatibility of silica chemistry with covalent coupling of biomolecules. Carbon nanotubes-composite materials, such as those based on Carbon nanotubes bound to nanoparticles, are suitable, in order to tailor Carbon nanotubes properties for specific applications. We present a tunable synthesis of Multi Wall Carbon nanotubes-Silica nanoparticles. The control of the nanotube morphology and the bead size, coupled with the versatility of silica chemistry, makes these structures an excellent platform for the development of biosensors (optical, magnetic and catalytic applications). We describe the construction and characterization of supramolecular nanostructures consisting of ruthenium-complex luminophores, directly grafted onto short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or physically entrapped in silica nanobeads, which had been covalently linked to short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or hydrophobically adsorbed onto full-length multi-walled carbon nanotubes. These structures have been evaluated as potential electron-acceptor complexes for use in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices, and for their properties as fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Finally, we compare the toxicity of pristine and oxidized Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes on human T cells - which would be among the first exposed cell types upon intravenous administration of Carbon nanotubes in therapeutic and diagnostic nanodevices. Our results suggest that carbon nanotubes indeed can be very toxic and induce massive loss of cell viability through programmed cell death at sufficiently high concentrations (>1ng/cell). The cytotoxicity of Carbon nanotubes does depend on many other factors than concentration, including their physical form, diameter, length, and the nature of attached molecules or nanomaterials: carbon black, for instance, is less toxic than pristine CNTs (what shows the relevance of structure and topology); oxidized CNTs are more toxic than pristine CNTs. © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd.

Bellucci, S., Bergamaschi, A., Bottini, M., Magrini, A., & Mustelin, T. (2007). Biomedical platforms based on composite nanomaterials and cellular toxicity. JOURNAL OF PHYSICS. CONFERENCE SERIES, 61(1), 95-98 [10.1088/1742-6596/61/1/020].

Biomedical platforms based on composite nanomaterials and cellular toxicity

BOTTINI, MASSIMO;MAGRINI, ANDREA;
2007

Abstract

Carbon nanotubes possess unique chemical, physical, optical, and magnetic properties, which make them suitable for many uses in industrial products and in the field of nanotechnology, including nanomedicine. We describe fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Then we describe recent results on the issue of cytotoxicity of carbon nanotubes obtained in our labs. Silica nanoparticles have been widely used for biosensing and catalytic applications due to their large surface area-to-volume ratio, straightforward manufacture, and the compatibility of silica chemistry with covalent coupling of biomolecules. Carbon nanotubes-composite materials, such as those based on Carbon nanotubes bound to nanoparticles, are suitable, in order to tailor Carbon nanotubes properties for specific applications. We present a tunable synthesis of Multi Wall Carbon nanotubes-Silica nanoparticles. The control of the nanotube morphology and the bead size, coupled with the versatility of silica chemistry, makes these structures an excellent platform for the development of biosensors (optical, magnetic and catalytic applications). We describe the construction and characterization of supramolecular nanostructures consisting of ruthenium-complex luminophores, directly grafted onto short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or physically entrapped in silica nanobeads, which had been covalently linked to short oxidized single-walled carbon nanotubes or hydrophobically adsorbed onto full-length multi-walled carbon nanotubes. These structures have been evaluated as potential electron-acceptor complexes for use in the fabrication of photovoltaic devices, and for their properties as fluorescent nanocomposites for use in biosensors or nanoelectronics. Finally, we compare the toxicity of pristine and oxidized Multi Walled Carbon nanotubes on human T cells - which would be among the first exposed cell types upon intravenous administration of Carbon nanotubes in therapeutic and diagnostic nanodevices. Our results suggest that carbon nanotubes indeed can be very toxic and induce massive loss of cell viability through programmed cell death at sufficiently high concentrations (>1ng/cell). The cytotoxicity of Carbon nanotubes does depend on many other factors than concentration, including their physical form, diameter, length, and the nature of attached molecules or nanomaterials: carbon black, for instance, is less toxic than pristine CNTs (what shows the relevance of structure and topology); oxidized CNTs are more toxic than pristine CNTs. © 2007 IOP Publishing Ltd.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Sì, ma tipo non specificato
Settore BIO/10
English
Bellucci, S., Bergamaschi, A., Bottini, M., Magrini, A., & Mustelin, T. (2007). Biomedical platforms based on composite nanomaterials and cellular toxicity. JOURNAL OF PHYSICS. CONFERENCE SERIES, 61(1), 95-98 [10.1088/1742-6596/61/1/020].
Bellucci, S; Bergamaschi, A; Bottini, M; Magrini, A; Mustelin, T
Articolo su rivista
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/45332
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