nonrepresentative estimates indicate that 25%–50% of transgender people are parents. Yet very little is known about their demographic characteristics and health outcomes. the present study compared the quality of life and several mental health (i.e., psychological distress, life satisfaction, happiness, social well-being) and health (i.e., physical health, alcohol and drug use) dimensions by gender identity and parenthood status in a probability sample of 1,436 transgender and cisgender respondents to the U.S. transgender population health survey (transPop study). an estimated 18.8% of transgender respondents were parents, with the majority (52.5%) being transgender women. after controlling for age, education, and relationship status, there were no significant differences between trans- and cisgender parents and their nonparent counterparts on any mental health or health dimensions. these findings are important to family practitioners and policymakers so that they do not mistakenly assume that any problems transgender parents may report reveal their unsuitability to parent. Rather, because differences in health outcomes were seen only across gender identities, such problems are more likely related to stigma and discrimination experiences in a cisgenderist/heterosexist society.

Carone, N., Rothblum, E.d., Bos, H., Gartrell, N.k., Herman, J.l. (2021). Demographics and Health Outcomes in a U.S. Probability Sample of Transgender Parents. JOURNAL OF FAMILY PSYCHOLOGY, 35(1), 57-68 [10.1037/fam0000776].

Demographics and Health Outcomes in a U.S. Probability Sample of Transgender Parents

Nicola Carone
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2021-01-01

Abstract

nonrepresentative estimates indicate that 25%–50% of transgender people are parents. Yet very little is known about their demographic characteristics and health outcomes. the present study compared the quality of life and several mental health (i.e., psychological distress, life satisfaction, happiness, social well-being) and health (i.e., physical health, alcohol and drug use) dimensions by gender identity and parenthood status in a probability sample of 1,436 transgender and cisgender respondents to the U.S. transgender population health survey (transPop study). an estimated 18.8% of transgender respondents were parents, with the majority (52.5%) being transgender women. after controlling for age, education, and relationship status, there were no significant differences between trans- and cisgender parents and their nonparent counterparts on any mental health or health dimensions. these findings are important to family practitioners and policymakers so that they do not mistakenly assume that any problems transgender parents may report reveal their unsuitability to parent. Rather, because differences in health outcomes were seen only across gender identities, such problems are more likely related to stigma and discrimination experiences in a cisgenderist/heterosexist society.
2021
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore M-PSI/07
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
transgender parents
childlessness
TransPop study
transgender mental health
transgender health behaviors
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/2020-73319-001
Carone, N., Rothblum, E.d., Bos, H., Gartrell, N.k., Herman, J.l. (2021). Demographics and Health Outcomes in a U.S. Probability Sample of Transgender Parents. JOURNAL OF FAMILY PSYCHOLOGY, 35(1), 57-68 [10.1037/fam0000776].
Carone, N; Rothblum, Ed; Bos, Hmw; Gartrell, Nk; Herman, Jl
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/363030
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