Aim. The Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) is a self-administered 7-point Likert scale of 33 items, structured in 6 factors measuring personal and interpersonal resources. We aimed to develop and validate a brief form of the RSA, in order to produce a short, fast and handy tool for assessing resilience. Materials and methods. A non-clinical sample of 500 university students was recruited using a research website. Reduction of the RSA-33 was performed using an item response theory (IRT) analysis by means of a Graded Response Model (GRM) protocol on the 6 RSA factors separately. After the IRT reduction process, a Pearson's correlation matrix of the original RSA-33 and the reduced version was estimated. Finally, a CFA was estimated to assess factorial validity. The estimation of item discrimination from the GRM ranged from 0.69 and 5.94 and allowed to retain 11 items. Results. For both the original RSA-33 and the brief RSA-11, the strongest correlations were between Family Cohesion and Social Resources factors. CFA was estimated to assess factorial validity in a simplified model with two latent first-order factors, i.e., Personal and Contextual resources. Conclusions. The availability of short and psychometrically robust measures is needed to improve evaluation and monitoring in mental health programs. For this reason, we provided a brief and effective tool to assess resilience resources in both research and clinical settings.

Rossi, R., Socci, V., Jannini, T., Collazzoni, A., Pacitti, F., Di Lorenzo, G., et al. (2021). Validation of a brief version of the resilience scale for adults on an Italian non-clinical sample. RIVISTA DI PSICHIATRIA, 56(6), 308-313 [10.1708/3713.37044].

Validation of a brief version of the resilience scale for adults on an Italian non-clinical sample

Rossi, R;Di Lorenzo, G;
2021-01-01

Abstract

Aim. The Resilience Scale for Adults (RSA) is a self-administered 7-point Likert scale of 33 items, structured in 6 factors measuring personal and interpersonal resources. We aimed to develop and validate a brief form of the RSA, in order to produce a short, fast and handy tool for assessing resilience. Materials and methods. A non-clinical sample of 500 university students was recruited using a research website. Reduction of the RSA-33 was performed using an item response theory (IRT) analysis by means of a Graded Response Model (GRM) protocol on the 6 RSA factors separately. After the IRT reduction process, a Pearson's correlation matrix of the original RSA-33 and the reduced version was estimated. Finally, a CFA was estimated to assess factorial validity. The estimation of item discrimination from the GRM ranged from 0.69 and 5.94 and allowed to retain 11 items. Results. For both the original RSA-33 and the brief RSA-11, the strongest correlations were between Family Cohesion and Social Resources factors. CFA was estimated to assess factorial validity in a simplified model with two latent first-order factors, i.e., Personal and Contextual resources. Conclusions. The availability of short and psychometrically robust measures is needed to improve evaluation and monitoring in mental health programs. For this reason, we provided a brief and effective tool to assess resilience resources in both research and clinical settings.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/25
English
resilience
positive psychology
validation
Item Response Theory
Rossi, R., Socci, V., Jannini, T., Collazzoni, A., Pacitti, F., Di Lorenzo, G., et al. (2021). Validation of a brief version of the resilience scale for adults on an Italian non-clinical sample. RIVISTA DI PSICHIATRIA, 56(6), 308-313 [10.1708/3713.37044].
Rossi, R; Socci, V; Jannini, T; Collazzoni, A; Pacitti, F; Di Lorenzo, G; Rossi, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/309332
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