The number of studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) concentration has substantially grown in the last fifteen years. A systematic review on this field has been realized by evaluating in the identified studies the in vitro PRP concentration-also analyzing the platelet amount-and the in vivo PRP effects in tissue regeneration compared to any control. The protocol has been developed in agreement with the Preferred Reporting for Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses-Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Multistep research of the PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, PreMEDLINE, Ebase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Clinicaltrials.gov, Scopus database and Cochrane databases has permitted to identify articles on different concentrations of PRP in vitro and related in vivo impact for tissue repair. Of the 965 articles initially identified, 30 articles focusing on PRP concentration have been selected and, consequently, only 15 articles have been analyzed. In total, 40% (n= 6) of the studies were related to the fixed PRP Concentration Group used a fixed PRP concentration and altered the platelet concentration by adding the different volumes of the PRP (lysate) to the culture. This technique led to a substantial decrease in nutrition available at higher concentrations. Sixty percent (n= 9) of the studies were related to the fixed PRP Volume Group that used a fixed PRP-to-media ratio (Vol/Vol) throughout the experiment and altered the concentration within the PRP volume. For both groups, when the volume of medium (nutrition) decreases, a lower rate of cell proliferation is observed. A PRP concentration of 1.0 x 10(6)plt/mu L, appears to be optimal thanks to the constant and plentiful capillary nutrition supply and rapid diffusion of growth factors that happen in vivo and it also respects the blood decree-law. The PRP/media ratio should provide a sufficient nutrition supply to prevent cellular starvation, that is, PRP <= 10% (Vol/Vol) and thus best mimic the conditions in vivo.

Gentile, P., Garcovich, S. (2020). Systematic Review-The Potential Implications of Different Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Concentrations in Regenerative Medicine for Tissue Repair. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 21(16), 1-22 [10.3390/ijms21165702].

Systematic Review-The Potential Implications of Different Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Concentrations in Regenerative Medicine for Tissue Repair

Gentile, Pietro
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
2020-08-09

Abstract

The number of studies evaluating platelet-rich plasma (PRP) concentration has substantially grown in the last fifteen years. A systematic review on this field has been realized by evaluating in the identified studies the in vitro PRP concentration-also analyzing the platelet amount-and the in vivo PRP effects in tissue regeneration compared to any control. The protocol has been developed in agreement with the Preferred Reporting for Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses-Protocols (PRISMA-P) guidelines. Multistep research of the PubMed, MEDLINE, Embase, PreMEDLINE, Ebase, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Clinicaltrials.gov, Scopus database and Cochrane databases has permitted to identify articles on different concentrations of PRP in vitro and related in vivo impact for tissue repair. Of the 965 articles initially identified, 30 articles focusing on PRP concentration have been selected and, consequently, only 15 articles have been analyzed. In total, 40% (n= 6) of the studies were related to the fixed PRP Concentration Group used a fixed PRP concentration and altered the platelet concentration by adding the different volumes of the PRP (lysate) to the culture. This technique led to a substantial decrease in nutrition available at higher concentrations. Sixty percent (n= 9) of the studies were related to the fixed PRP Volume Group that used a fixed PRP-to-media ratio (Vol/Vol) throughout the experiment and altered the concentration within the PRP volume. For both groups, when the volume of medium (nutrition) decreases, a lower rate of cell proliferation is observed. A PRP concentration of 1.0 x 10(6)plt/mu L, appears to be optimal thanks to the constant and plentiful capillary nutrition supply and rapid diffusion of growth factors that happen in vivo and it also respects the blood decree-law. The PRP/media ratio should provide a sufficient nutrition supply to prevent cellular starvation, that is, PRP <= 10% (Vol/Vol) and thus best mimic the conditions in vivo.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Recensione
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/19
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
PRP concentration
PRP in vivo effect
PRP regenerative medicine
PRP tissue regeneration
Animals
Humans
Outcome Assessment, Health Care
Platelet Count
Platelet-Rich Plasma
Practice Guidelines as Topic
Regenerative Medicine
Research Design
Wounds and Injuries
Wound Healing
Gentile, P., Garcovich, S. (2020). Systematic Review-The Potential Implications of Different Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) Concentrations in Regenerative Medicine for Tissue Repair. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF MOLECULAR SCIENCES, 21(16), 1-22 [10.3390/ijms21165702].
Gentile, P; Garcovich, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/303520
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