Soil salinization, one of the most common causes of soil degradation, negatively affects plant growth, reproduction, and yield in plants. Saline conditions elicit some physiological changes to cope with the imposed osmotic and oxidative stresses. Inoculation of plants with some bacterial species that stimulate their growth, i.e., plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), may help plants to counteract saline stress, thus improving the plant’s fitness. This manuscript reports the effects of the inoculation of a salt-sensitive cultivar of Brassica napus (canola) with five different PGPB species (separately), i.e., Azospirillum brasilense, Arthrobacter globiformis, Burkholderia ambifaria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae, and Pseudomonas sp. on plant salt stress physiological responses. The seeds were sown in saline soil (8 dS/m) and inoculated with bacterial suspensions. Seedlings were grown to the phenological stage of rosetta, when morphological and physiological features were determined. In the presence of the above-mentioned PGPB, salt exposed canola plants grew better than noninoculated controls. The water loss was reduced in inoculated plants under saline conditions, due to a low level of membrane damage and the enhanced synthesis of the osmolyte proline, the latter depending on the bacterial strain inoculated. The reduction in membrane damage was also due to the increased antioxidant activity (i.e., higher amount of phenolic compounds, enhanced superoxide dismutase, and ascorbate peroxidase activities) in salt-stressed and inoculated Brassica napus. Furthermore, the salt-stressed and inoculated plants did not show detrimental effects to their photosynthetic apparatus, i.e., higher efficiency of PSII and low energy dissipation by heat for photosynthesis were detected. The improvement of the response to salt stress provided by PGPB paves the way to further use of PGPB as inoculants of plants grown in saline soils.

Rossi, M., Borromeo, I., Capo, C., Glick, B.r., Del Gallo, M., Pietrini, F., et al. (2021). PGPB Improve Photosynthetic Activity and Tolerance to Oxidative Stress in Brassica napus Grown on Salinized Soils. APPLIED SCIENCES, 11, 11442 [10.3390/ app112311442].

PGPB Improve Photosynthetic Activity and Tolerance to Oxidative Stress in Brassica napus Grown on Salinized Soils.

Capo C.;Forni C.
2021-12-02

Abstract

Soil salinization, one of the most common causes of soil degradation, negatively affects plant growth, reproduction, and yield in plants. Saline conditions elicit some physiological changes to cope with the imposed osmotic and oxidative stresses. Inoculation of plants with some bacterial species that stimulate their growth, i.e., plant growth-promoting bacteria (PGPB), may help plants to counteract saline stress, thus improving the plant’s fitness. This manuscript reports the effects of the inoculation of a salt-sensitive cultivar of Brassica napus (canola) with five different PGPB species (separately), i.e., Azospirillum brasilense, Arthrobacter globiformis, Burkholderia ambifaria, Herbaspirillum seropedicae, and Pseudomonas sp. on plant salt stress physiological responses. The seeds were sown in saline soil (8 dS/m) and inoculated with bacterial suspensions. Seedlings were grown to the phenological stage of rosetta, when morphological and physiological features were determined. In the presence of the above-mentioned PGPB, salt exposed canola plants grew better than noninoculated controls. The water loss was reduced in inoculated plants under saline conditions, due to a low level of membrane damage and the enhanced synthesis of the osmolyte proline, the latter depending on the bacterial strain inoculated. The reduction in membrane damage was also due to the increased antioxidant activity (i.e., higher amount of phenolic compounds, enhanced superoxide dismutase, and ascorbate peroxidase activities) in salt-stressed and inoculated Brassica napus. Furthermore, the salt-stressed and inoculated plants did not show detrimental effects to their photosynthetic apparatus, i.e., higher efficiency of PSII and low energy dissipation by heat for photosynthesis were detected. The improvement of the response to salt stress provided by PGPB paves the way to further use of PGPB as inoculants of plants grown in saline soils.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/01
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Brassica napus; PGPB; salt stress; photosynthesis; oxidative stress
Rossi, M., Borromeo, I., Capo, C., Glick, B.r., Del Gallo, M., Pietrini, F., et al. (2021). PGPB Improve Photosynthetic Activity and Tolerance to Oxidative Stress in Brassica napus Grown on Salinized Soils. APPLIED SCIENCES, 11, 11442 [10.3390/ app112311442].
Rossi, M; Borromeo, I; Capo, C; Glick, Br; Del Gallo, M; Pietrini, F; Forni, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/302696
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