Ingestion of soil represents one of the critical exposure pathways in the human health risk assessment (HHRA) framework at sites contaminated by inorganic species, especially for residential scenarios. HHRA is typically carried out through starting from the so-called “total concentration”, which is estimated from the fraction of inorganic species extracted from the soil using standardized approaches, i.e., microwave acid extraction. Due to the milder conditions, a smaller portion of the inorganics present in the soil is actually dissolved in the gastro-intestinal tract (bioaccessible fraction), and afterward reaches the bloodstream, exerting an effect on human health (bioavailable fraction). Including bioaccessibility in HHRA could then allow for the achievement of a more realistic assessment than using the total concentration. In this paper, the bioaccessible concentration of different inorganics in soil samples collected from a firing range was estimated by applying two in vitro tests, i.e., the Unified Barge Method (UBM) and the Simple Bioaccessibility Extraction Test (SBET). Moreover, different options for incorporating bioaccessibility in HHRA for the estimation of the cleanup goals were also applied and discussed. Despite the notable differences in terms of reagents and procedure between the two methods, the obtained results were quite close, with the SBET method providing slightly higher values. The role of the soil particle size distribution on the calculation of the cleanup goals accounting for bioaccessibility is also discussed.

Zingaretti, D., & Baciocchi, R. (2021). Different approaches for incorporating bioaccessibility of inorganics in human health risk assessment of contaminated soils. APPLIED SCIENCES, 11(7) [10.3390/app11073005].

Different approaches for incorporating bioaccessibility of inorganics in human health risk assessment of contaminated soils

Zingaretti D.;Baciocchi R.
2021

Abstract

Ingestion of soil represents one of the critical exposure pathways in the human health risk assessment (HHRA) framework at sites contaminated by inorganic species, especially for residential scenarios. HHRA is typically carried out through starting from the so-called “total concentration”, which is estimated from the fraction of inorganic species extracted from the soil using standardized approaches, i.e., microwave acid extraction. Due to the milder conditions, a smaller portion of the inorganics present in the soil is actually dissolved in the gastro-intestinal tract (bioaccessible fraction), and afterward reaches the bloodstream, exerting an effect on human health (bioavailable fraction). Including bioaccessibility in HHRA could then allow for the achievement of a more realistic assessment than using the total concentration. In this paper, the bioaccessible concentration of different inorganics in soil samples collected from a firing range was estimated by applying two in vitro tests, i.e., the Unified Barge Method (UBM) and the Simple Bioaccessibility Extraction Test (SBET). Moreover, different options for incorporating bioaccessibility in HHRA for the estimation of the cleanup goals were also applied and discussed. Despite the notable differences in terms of reagents and procedure between the two methods, the obtained results were quite close, with the SBET method providing slightly higher values. The role of the soil particle size distribution on the calculation of the cleanup goals accounting for bioaccessibility is also discussed.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore ICAR/03
eng
Bioaccessibility
Bioavailability
Contaminated sites
Metals
Risk assessment
Zingaretti, D., & Baciocchi, R. (2021). Different approaches for incorporating bioaccessibility of inorganics in human health risk assessment of contaminated soils. APPLIED SCIENCES, 11(7) [10.3390/app11073005].
Zingaretti, D; Baciocchi, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/292135
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