Background: Human health is closely interconnected with its microbiome. Resilient microbiomes in, on, and around the human body will be key for safe and successful long-term space travel. However, longitudinal dynamics of microbiomes inside confined built environments are still poorly understood. Herein, we used the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation IV (HI-SEAS IV) mission, a 1 year-long isolation study, to investigate microbial transfer between crew and habitat, in order to understand adverse developments which may occur in a future outpost on the Moon or Mars. Results: Longitudinal 16S rRNA gene profiles, as well as quantitative observations, revealed significant differences in microbial diversity, abundance, and composition between samples of the built environment and its crew. The microbiome composition and diversity associated with abiotic surfaces was found to be rather stable, whereas the microbial skin profiles of individual crew members were highly dynamic, resulting in an increased microbiome diversity at the end of the isolation period. The skin microbiome dynamics were especially pronounced by a regular transfer of the indicator species Methanobrevibacter between crew members within the first 200 days. Quantitative information was used to track the propagation of antimicrobial resistance in the habitat. Together with functional and phenotypic predictions, quantitative and qualitative data supported the observation of a delayed longitudinal microbial homogenization between crew and habitat surfaces which was mainly caused by a malfunctioning sanitary facility. Conclusions: This study highlights main routes of microbial transfer, interaction of the crew, and origins of microbial dynamics in an isolated environment. We identify key targets of microbial monitoring, and emphasize the need for defined baselines of microbiome diversity and abundance on surfaces and crew skin. Targeted manipulation to counteract adverse developments of the microbiome could be a highly important strategy to ensure safety during future space endeavors.

Mahnert, A., Verseux, C., Schwendner, P., Koskinen, K., Kumpitsch, C., Blohs, M., et al. (2021). Microbiome dynamics during the HI-SEAS IV mission, and implications for future crewed missions beyond Earth. MICROBIOME [10.1186/s40168-020-00959-x].

Microbiome dynamics during the HI-SEAS IV mission, and implications for future crewed missions beyond Earth.

Verseux C;Billi D;
2021

Abstract

Background: Human health is closely interconnected with its microbiome. Resilient microbiomes in, on, and around the human body will be key for safe and successful long-term space travel. However, longitudinal dynamics of microbiomes inside confined built environments are still poorly understood. Herein, we used the Hawaii Space Exploration Analog and Simulation IV (HI-SEAS IV) mission, a 1 year-long isolation study, to investigate microbial transfer between crew and habitat, in order to understand adverse developments which may occur in a future outpost on the Moon or Mars. Results: Longitudinal 16S rRNA gene profiles, as well as quantitative observations, revealed significant differences in microbial diversity, abundance, and composition between samples of the built environment and its crew. The microbiome composition and diversity associated with abiotic surfaces was found to be rather stable, whereas the microbial skin profiles of individual crew members were highly dynamic, resulting in an increased microbiome diversity at the end of the isolation period. The skin microbiome dynamics were especially pronounced by a regular transfer of the indicator species Methanobrevibacter between crew members within the first 200 days. Quantitative information was used to track the propagation of antimicrobial resistance in the habitat. Together with functional and phenotypic predictions, quantitative and qualitative data supported the observation of a delayed longitudinal microbial homogenization between crew and habitat surfaces which was mainly caused by a malfunctioning sanitary facility. Conclusions: This study highlights main routes of microbial transfer, interaction of the crew, and origins of microbial dynamics in an isolated environment. We identify key targets of microbial monitoring, and emphasize the need for defined baselines of microbiome diversity and abundance on surfaces and crew skin. Targeted manipulation to counteract adverse developments of the microbiome could be a highly important strategy to ensure safety during future space endeavors.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/01
eng
Con Impact Factor ISI
Mahnert, A., Verseux, C., Schwendner, P., Koskinen, K., Kumpitsch, C., Blohs, M., et al. (2021). Microbiome dynamics during the HI-SEAS IV mission, and implications for future crewed missions beyond Earth. MICROBIOME [10.1186/s40168-020-00959-x].
Mahnert, A; Verseux, C; Schwendner, P; Koskinen, K; Kumpitsch, C; Blohs, M; Wink, L; Brunner, D; Goessler, T; Billi, D; Moissl-Eichinger, C
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/283657
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