Introduction: Masculinity and femininity constitute the gender role construct into the general concept of sexual identity. Aim: To investigate the relationships of attachment style, sexual orientation and biological sex with the gender role. Methods: A convenience sample of 344 subjects (females = 207; males = 137) was recruited. Main outcome measures: The Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the Kinsey Scale, and the Bem Sex Role Inventory assessed, respectively, attachment styles, sexual orientation, and masculinity/femininity was administered. Results: Regression analysis revealed that the confidence scale of the ASQ (secure attachment) and relationship as secondary scale of ASQ (insecure/dismissing attachment) have a predictive role toward a higher score of masculinity (β = 0.201; P = .000 and β = 0.208; P = .000, respectively), whereas the need of approval scale of the ASQ (insecure/fearful-preoccupied attachment) shows a reverse association on it (β = -0.228; P = .001). Moreover, to be a male is predictive for masculinity (β = 0.196; P = .000). Also, femininity is predicted by the confidence (β = 0.173; P = .002) and the need of approval (β = 0.151; P = .03) scales of ASQ. Instead, the relationship as secondary scale of ASQ is negatively related to femininity (β = -0.198; P = .0001). No association between non-heterosexual orientation and gender role was found. Clinical implications: A better knowledge of links between relational patterns and gender roles for assessment and anamnesis phases in sexual medicine. Strengths & limitations: This is the first study considering sexual orientation and biological sex in the relationship between attachment styles and gender role. The main limitation is the use of self-reported psychometric tests. Conclusion: Our data indicate that a secure attachment is related to both masculinity and femininity. On the contrary, different and reverse aspects of insecure attachment style characterize masculinity and femininity. Masculinity is mostly linked to insecure/dismissing attachment, whereas femininity is linked to insecure/fearful-preoccupied attachment. Moreover, although being male is a further element in support of masculinity, sexual orientation is not associated with gender role

Ciocca, G., Zauri, S., Limoncin, E., Mollaioli, D., D'Antuono, L., Carosa, E., et al. (2020). Attachment Style, Sexual Orientation, and Biological Sex in their Relationships With Gender Role. SEXUAL MEDICINE, 8(1), 76-83 [10.1016/j.esxm.2019.09.001].

Attachment Style, Sexual Orientation, and Biological Sex in their Relationships With Gender Role

Jannini, Emmanuele A
2020-03-01

Abstract

Introduction: Masculinity and femininity constitute the gender role construct into the general concept of sexual identity. Aim: To investigate the relationships of attachment style, sexual orientation and biological sex with the gender role. Methods: A convenience sample of 344 subjects (females = 207; males = 137) was recruited. Main outcome measures: The Attachment Style Questionnaire (ASQ), the Kinsey Scale, and the Bem Sex Role Inventory assessed, respectively, attachment styles, sexual orientation, and masculinity/femininity was administered. Results: Regression analysis revealed that the confidence scale of the ASQ (secure attachment) and relationship as secondary scale of ASQ (insecure/dismissing attachment) have a predictive role toward a higher score of masculinity (β = 0.201; P = .000 and β = 0.208; P = .000, respectively), whereas the need of approval scale of the ASQ (insecure/fearful-preoccupied attachment) shows a reverse association on it (β = -0.228; P = .001). Moreover, to be a male is predictive for masculinity (β = 0.196; P = .000). Also, femininity is predicted by the confidence (β = 0.173; P = .002) and the need of approval (β = 0.151; P = .03) scales of ASQ. Instead, the relationship as secondary scale of ASQ is negatively related to femininity (β = -0.198; P = .0001). No association between non-heterosexual orientation and gender role was found. Clinical implications: A better knowledge of links between relational patterns and gender roles for assessment and anamnesis phases in sexual medicine. Strengths & limitations: This is the first study considering sexual orientation and biological sex in the relationship between attachment styles and gender role. The main limitation is the use of self-reported psychometric tests. Conclusion: Our data indicate that a secure attachment is related to both masculinity and femininity. On the contrary, different and reverse aspects of insecure attachment style characterize masculinity and femininity. Masculinity is mostly linked to insecure/dismissing attachment, whereas femininity is linked to insecure/fearful-preoccupied attachment. Moreover, although being male is a further element in support of masculinity, sexual orientation is not associated with gender role
mar-2020
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/13 - ENDOCRINOLOGIA
English
Attachment Style
Biological Sex
Gender Role
Sexual Orientation
Ciocca, G., Zauri, S., Limoncin, E., Mollaioli, D., D'Antuono, L., Carosa, E., et al. (2020). Attachment Style, Sexual Orientation, and Biological Sex in their Relationships With Gender Role. SEXUAL MEDICINE, 8(1), 76-83 [10.1016/j.esxm.2019.09.001].
Ciocca, G; Zauri, S; Limoncin, E; Mollaioli, D; D'Antuono, L; Carosa, E; Nimbi, Fm; Simonelli, C; Balercia, G; Reisman, Y; Jannini, Ea
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/262912
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