The personal trait called Core Self-Evaluations (CSE) has been receiving increasing attention from behavioral strategy scholars due to its ability to predict job performance and to explain some facets of decision-making processes. However, despite previous studies hypothesizing that managers with high values of CSE are intuitive thinkers, beyond any doubt of their capacities and that they significantly lead to positive results for their organization, no one has empirically investigated these assumptions. This gap can be substantiated by the following research question: “How do high Core Self-Evaluations influence team decision-making processes?”. Answering it provides insights on how the evaluations that decision makers make about situations (and the consequent actions that are implemented) highly depend on decision makers’ inner traits and their effect on cognition. To fill this gap, 120 graduate students—divided into groups of four—took part in a simulation game and were asked to make decisions acting the role of General Manager of a small-sized manufacturing firm. Tests aimed at identifying the CSE and intuitive/reflecting thinking approach of participants were administered; moreover, the performance resulting from their decision-making processes and their estimation of reached results were collected. Results show that an average level of CSE is preferable to balance intuitive and reflective thinking, as well as avoiding overconfidence bias and reaching the best performance possible. This work suggests that there is a huge misattribution in considering a high level of CSE as being beneficial for decision-making processes and consequent performance.

CRISTOFARO, M., Luigi Giardino, P., & LEONI, L. (2020). The Influence of Core Self-Evaluations on Group Decision Making Processes: A Laboratory Experiment. ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES, 10, 29-44.

The Influence of Core Self-Evaluations on Group Decision Making Processes: A Laboratory Experiment

Matteo Cristofaro;Luna Leoni
2020-05-07

Abstract

The personal trait called Core Self-Evaluations (CSE) has been receiving increasing attention from behavioral strategy scholars due to its ability to predict job performance and to explain some facets of decision-making processes. However, despite previous studies hypothesizing that managers with high values of CSE are intuitive thinkers, beyond any doubt of their capacities and that they significantly lead to positive results for their organization, no one has empirically investigated these assumptions. This gap can be substantiated by the following research question: “How do high Core Self-Evaluations influence team decision-making processes?”. Answering it provides insights on how the evaluations that decision makers make about situations (and the consequent actions that are implemented) highly depend on decision makers’ inner traits and their effect on cognition. To fill this gap, 120 graduate students—divided into groups of four—took part in a simulation game and were asked to make decisions acting the role of General Manager of a small-sized manufacturing firm. Tests aimed at identifying the CSE and intuitive/reflecting thinking approach of participants were administered; moreover, the performance resulting from their decision-making processes and their estimation of reached results were collected. Results show that an average level of CSE is preferable to balance intuitive and reflective thinking, as well as avoiding overconfidence bias and reaching the best performance possible. This work suggests that there is a huge misattribution in considering a high level of CSE as being beneficial for decision-making processes and consequent performance.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore SECS-P/08
eng
behavioral strategy; decision-making; core self-evaluations; intuition; overconfidence; performance
CRISTOFARO, M., Luigi Giardino, P., & LEONI, L. (2020). The Influence of Core Self-Evaluations on Group Decision Making Processes: A Laboratory Experiment. ADMINISTRATIVE SCIENCES, 10, 29-44.
Cristofaro, M; Luigi Giardino, P; Leoni, L
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/246718
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