In this study, next generation sequencing and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, combined with confocal microscopy, were used to provide insights into the biodiversity and structure of biofilms collected from four full-scale European cooling systems. Water samples were also analyzed to evaluate the impact of suspended microbes on biofilm formation. A common core microbiome, containing members of the families Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae and Hyphomicrobiaceae, was found in all four biofilms, despite the water of each coming from different sources (river and groundwater). This suggests that selection of the pioneer community was influenced by abiotic factors (temperature, pH) and tolerances to biocides. Members of the Sphingomonadaceae were assumed to play a key role in initial biofilm formation. Subsequent biofilm development was driven primarily by light availability, since biofilms were dominated by phototrophs in the two studied ‘open’ systems. Their interactions with other microbial populations then shaped the structure of the mature biofilm communities analyzed.

Di Gregorio, L., Tandoi, V., Congestri, R., Rossetti, S., Di Pippo, F. (2017). Unravelling the core microbiome of biofilms in cooling tower systems. BIOFOULING, 33(10), 793-806 [10.1080/08927014.2017.1367386].

Unravelling the core microbiome of biofilms in cooling tower systems

Di Gregorio, L.;Congestri, R.;
2017

Abstract

In this study, next generation sequencing and catalyzed reporter deposition fluorescence in situ hybridization, combined with confocal microscopy, were used to provide insights into the biodiversity and structure of biofilms collected from four full-scale European cooling systems. Water samples were also analyzed to evaluate the impact of suspended microbes on biofilm formation. A common core microbiome, containing members of the families Sphingomonadaceae, Comamonadaceae and Hyphomicrobiaceae, was found in all four biofilms, despite the water of each coming from different sources (river and groundwater). This suggests that selection of the pioneer community was influenced by abiotic factors (temperature, pH) and tolerances to biocides. Members of the Sphingomonadaceae were assumed to play a key role in initial biofilm formation. Subsequent biofilm development was driven primarily by light availability, since biofilms were dominated by phototrophs in the two studied ‘open’ systems. Their interactions with other microbial populations then shaped the structure of the mature biofilm communities analyzed.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/01
English
Biofilms; cooling systems; core microbiome; NGS; pioneer species; Biofilms; Disinfectants; Drug Industry; Groundwater; High-Throughput Nucleotide Sequencing; In Situ Hybridization, Fluorescence; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Microbiota; Oil and Gas Industry; Rivers; Biodiversity; Aquatic Science; Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology; Water Science and Technology
www.tandf.co.uk/journals/titles/08927014.asp
Di Gregorio, L., Tandoi, V., Congestri, R., Rossetti, S., Di Pippo, F. (2017). Unravelling the core microbiome of biofilms in cooling tower systems. BIOFOULING, 33(10), 793-806 [10.1080/08927014.2017.1367386].
Di Gregorio, L; Tandoi, V; Congestri, R; Rossetti, S; Di Pippo, F
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/213129
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