Current hypothesis suggest that tumors can originate from adult cells after a process of 'reprogramming' driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for the tumor growth and metastases. To date, the research effort has been directed to the identification, isolation and manipulation of this cell population. Independently of whether tumors were triggered by a reprogramming of gene expression or seeded by stem cells, their energetic metabolism is altered compared with a normal cell, resulting in a high aerobic glycolytic 'Warburg' phenotype and dysregulation of mitochondrial activity. This metabolic alteration is intricately linked to cancer progression.The aim of this work has been to demonstrate the possibility of differentiating a neoplastic cell toward different germ layer lineages, by evaluating the morphological, metabolic and functional changes occurring in this process. The cellular differentiation reported in this study brings to different conclusions from those present in the current literature. We demonstrate that 'in vitro' neuroblastoma cancer cells (chosen as experimental model) are able to differentiate directly into osteoblastic (by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor) and hepatic lineage without an intermediate 'stem' cell step. This process seems owing to a synergy among few master molecules, metabolic changes and scaffold presence acting in a concerted way to control the cell fate.

Carpentieri, A., Cozzoli, E., Scimeca, M., Bonanno, E., Sardanelli, A.m., & Gambacurta, A. (2015). Differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells toward the osteogenic lineage by mTOR inhibitor. CELL DEATH & DISEASE, 6(11), e1974 [10.1038/cddis.2015.244].

Differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells toward the osteogenic lineage by mTOR inhibitor

Carpentieri, A
Writing – Original Draft Preparation
;
Cozzoli, E
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Scimeca, M
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Bonanno, E
Membro del Collaboration Group
;
Gambacurta, A
Writing – Review & Editing
2015

Abstract

Current hypothesis suggest that tumors can originate from adult cells after a process of 'reprogramming' driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. These cancer cells, called cancer stem cells (CSCs), are responsible for the tumor growth and metastases. To date, the research effort has been directed to the identification, isolation and manipulation of this cell population. Independently of whether tumors were triggered by a reprogramming of gene expression or seeded by stem cells, their energetic metabolism is altered compared with a normal cell, resulting in a high aerobic glycolytic 'Warburg' phenotype and dysregulation of mitochondrial activity. This metabolic alteration is intricately linked to cancer progression.The aim of this work has been to demonstrate the possibility of differentiating a neoplastic cell toward different germ layer lineages, by evaluating the morphological, metabolic and functional changes occurring in this process. The cellular differentiation reported in this study brings to different conclusions from those present in the current literature. We demonstrate that 'in vitro' neuroblastoma cancer cells (chosen as experimental model) are able to differentiate directly into osteoblastic (by rapamycin, an mTOR inhibitor) and hepatic lineage without an intermediate 'stem' cell step. This process seems owing to a synergy among few master molecules, metabolic changes and scaffold presence acting in a concerted way to control the cell fate.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/11
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Carpentieri, A., Cozzoli, E., Scimeca, M., Bonanno, E., Sardanelli, A.m., & Gambacurta, A. (2015). Differentiation of human neuroblastoma cells toward the osteogenic lineage by mTOR inhibitor. CELL DEATH & DISEASE, 6(11), e1974 [10.1038/cddis.2015.244].
Carpentieri, A; Cozzoli, E; Scimeca, M; Bonanno, E; Sardanelli, Am; Gambacurta, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/194377
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