Fenton-like treatment (FLT) is an ISCO technique relying on the iron-induced H2O2activation in the presence of additives aimed at increasing the oxidant lifetime and maximizing iron solubility under natural soil pH conditions. The efficacy of FLT in the clean-up of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is well established at the field-scale. However, a better assessment of the impact of the FLT on density, diversity and activity of the indigenous soil microbiota, might provide further insights into an optimal combination between FLT and in-situ bioremediation (ISB). The aim of this work was to assess the impacts of FLT on the microbial community of a diesel-contaminated soil collected nearby a gasoline station. Different FLT conditions were tested by varying either the H2O2concentrations (2 and 6%) or the oxidant application mode (single or double dosage). The impact of these treatments on the indigenous microbial community was assessed immediately after the Fenton-like treatment and after 30, 60 and 90 d and compared with enhanced natural attenuation (ENA). After FLT, a dramatic decrease in bacterial density, diversity and functionality was evident. Although in microcosms with double dosing at 2% H2O2a delayed recovery of the indigenous microbiota was observed as compared to those subjected to single oxidant dose, after 60 d incubation the respiration rate increased from 0.036 to 0.256 μg C–CO2g−1soil h−1. Irrespective of the oxidant dose, best degradation results after 90 d incubation (around 80%) were observed with combined FLT, relying on double oxidant addition, and bioremediation.

Polli, F., Zingaretti, D., Crognale, S., Pesciaroli, L., D'Annibale, A., Petruccioli, M., et al. (2018). Impact of the Fenton-like treatment on the microbial community of a diesel-contaminated soil. CHEMOSPHERE, 191(January 2018), 580-588 [10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.081].

Impact of the Fenton-like treatment on the microbial community of a diesel-contaminated soil

Polli, Flavia;Zingaretti, Daniela;Baciocchi, Renato
2018

Abstract

Fenton-like treatment (FLT) is an ISCO technique relying on the iron-induced H2O2activation in the presence of additives aimed at increasing the oxidant lifetime and maximizing iron solubility under natural soil pH conditions. The efficacy of FLT in the clean-up of hydrocarbon-contaminated soils is well established at the field-scale. However, a better assessment of the impact of the FLT on density, diversity and activity of the indigenous soil microbiota, might provide further insights into an optimal combination between FLT and in-situ bioremediation (ISB). The aim of this work was to assess the impacts of FLT on the microbial community of a diesel-contaminated soil collected nearby a gasoline station. Different FLT conditions were tested by varying either the H2O2concentrations (2 and 6%) or the oxidant application mode (single or double dosage). The impact of these treatments on the indigenous microbial community was assessed immediately after the Fenton-like treatment and after 30, 60 and 90 d and compared with enhanced natural attenuation (ENA). After FLT, a dramatic decrease in bacterial density, diversity and functionality was evident. Although in microcosms with double dosing at 2% H2O2a delayed recovery of the indigenous microbiota was observed as compared to those subjected to single oxidant dose, after 60 d incubation the respiration rate increased from 0.036 to 0.256 μg C–CO2g−1soil h−1. Irrespective of the oxidant dose, best degradation results after 90 d incubation (around 80%) were observed with combined FLT, relying on double oxidant addition, and bioremediation.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore ICAR/03 - Ingegneria Sanitaria-Ambientale
English
Bioremediation; DGGE; Diesel contamination; Fenton; qPCR; Environmental Chemistry; Chemistry (all)
www.elsevier.com/locate/chemosphere
Polli, F., Zingaretti, D., Crognale, S., Pesciaroli, L., D'Annibale, A., Petruccioli, M., et al. (2018). Impact of the Fenton-like treatment on the microbial community of a diesel-contaminated soil. CHEMOSPHERE, 191(January 2018), 580-588 [10.1016/j.chemosphere.2017.10.081].
Polli, F; Zingaretti, D; Crognale, S; Pesciaroli, L; D'Annibale, A; Petruccioli, M; Baciocchi, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/193333
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