Recent data strongly suggest an association between the current outbreak of ZIKA virus (ZIKV) in many countries of Central and South America and a sharp increase in the detection of microcephaly and fetal malformations. The link with brain defect, which has been detected mainly in some areas of Brazil, is supported by the following evidence: (1) ZIKV transmission from infected pregnant women to their fetuses; (2) the potential of ZIKV to determine a specific congenital fetal syndrome characterized by abnormalities involving primarily the developing brain and eye. In particular, the risk of transmission and congenital disease appears to be restricted to mother's infection during the first trimester of pregnancy. Among brain defects, microcephaly, brain calcifications, and ventriculomegaly are the most frequent abnormalities of the central nervous system detected so far. However, relevant information on effect of maternal infection with ZIKV on the fetus is still limited. In this review, we focus our attention on current knowledge about ZIKV infection in pregnancy, discussing relevant issues and open problems which merit further investigation.

Ticconi, C., Pietropolli, A., & Rezza, G. (2016). Zika virus infection and pregnancy: what we do and do not know. PATHOGENS AND GLOBAL HEALTH, 110(7-8), 262-268 [10.1080/20477724.2016.1234804].

Zika virus infection and pregnancy: what we do and do not know

Ticconi C.;Pietropolli A.;Rezza G.
2016

Abstract

Recent data strongly suggest an association between the current outbreak of ZIKA virus (ZIKV) in many countries of Central and South America and a sharp increase in the detection of microcephaly and fetal malformations. The link with brain defect, which has been detected mainly in some areas of Brazil, is supported by the following evidence: (1) ZIKV transmission from infected pregnant women to their fetuses; (2) the potential of ZIKV to determine a specific congenital fetal syndrome characterized by abnormalities involving primarily the developing brain and eye. In particular, the risk of transmission and congenital disease appears to be restricted to mother's infection during the first trimester of pregnancy. Among brain defects, microcephaly, brain calcifications, and ventriculomegaly are the most frequent abnormalities of the central nervous system detected so far. However, relevant information on effect of maternal infection with ZIKV on the fetus is still limited. In this review, we focus our attention on current knowledge about ZIKV infection in pregnancy, discussing relevant issues and open problems which merit further investigation.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/40 - Ginecologia e Ostetricia
English
Congenital malformations; Microcephaly; Pregnancy; Zika Virus; Animals; Brain; Culicidae; Eye Abnormalities; Female; Fetus; Humans; Insect Vectors; Microcephaly; Pregnancy; Pregnancy Complications, Infectious; Zika Virus; Zika Virus Infection; Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Ticconi, C., Pietropolli, A., & Rezza, G. (2016). Zika virus infection and pregnancy: what we do and do not know. PATHOGENS AND GLOBAL HEALTH, 110(7-8), 262-268 [10.1080/20477724.2016.1234804].
Ticconi, C; Pietropolli, A; Rezza, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/192494
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