In multicellular organisms, proper development of gonads and germ cells is essential for the transmission of genetic information to the next generations and eventually for the survival of the species. For this reason, germline development is finely regulated to control germ cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Disruption of such controls can lead to infertility or germ cell tumors (GCTs). GCTs are particularly hideous pathologies since they occur mainly in neonates, infants, and children, rarely in the adults. They arise primarily in the testes and ovaries, though they can also develop in extragonadal sites along the midline of the body and the brain. Many similarities exist between most types of GCTs of the ovary and testis, including a morphological resemblance (often constituting a caricature of normal embryogenesis) and a similar pattern of chromosomal alterations. Furthermore, families with both ovarian and testicular GCTs have been reported, suggesting a possible common genetic etiology. This review focuses on the cellular processes, differentiation events and molecular mechanisms occurring during gonad development in mice and humans whose disturbance can be implicated in GCT formation.

DOLCI IANNINI, S., Campolo, F., DE FELICI, M. (2015). Gonadal development and germ cell tumors in mouse and humans. SEMINARS IN CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 45, 114-123 [10.1016/j.semcdb.2015.10.002].

Gonadal development and germ cell tumors in mouse and humans

DOLCI IANNINI, SUSANNA;CAMPOLO, FEDERICA;DE FELICI, MASSIMO
2015

Abstract

In multicellular organisms, proper development of gonads and germ cells is essential for the transmission of genetic information to the next generations and eventually for the survival of the species. For this reason, germline development is finely regulated to control germ cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Disruption of such controls can lead to infertility or germ cell tumors (GCTs). GCTs are particularly hideous pathologies since they occur mainly in neonates, infants, and children, rarely in the adults. They arise primarily in the testes and ovaries, though they can also develop in extragonadal sites along the midline of the body and the brain. Many similarities exist between most types of GCTs of the ovary and testis, including a morphological resemblance (often constituting a caricature of normal embryogenesis) and a similar pattern of chromosomal alterations. Furthermore, families with both ovarian and testicular GCTs have been reported, suggesting a possible common genetic etiology. This review focuses on the cellular processes, differentiation events and molecular mechanisms occurring during gonad development in mice and humans whose disturbance can be implicated in GCT formation.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/17
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
CIS; Germ cell tumors; Gonocytes; Oocytes; Ovary; PGCs; Spermatogonia; Testis; Animals; Cell Movement; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Female; Germ Cells; Humans; Male; Neoplasms, Germ Cell and Embryonal; Ovarian Neoplasms; Ovary; Testicular Neoplasms; Testis
DOLCI IANNINI, S., Campolo, F., DE FELICI, M. (2015). Gonadal development and germ cell tumors in mouse and humans. SEMINARS IN CELL & DEVELOPMENTAL BIOLOGY, 45, 114-123 [10.1016/j.semcdb.2015.10.002].
DOLCI IANNINI, S; Campolo, F; DE FELICI, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/173589
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