Increasing evidence suggests that motor rehabilitation may delay Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Moreover, parallel treatments in animals up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, we investigated the effect of a motor rehabilitation protocol on PD symptoms and BDNF serum levels. Motor rehabilitation training consisted of a cycle of 20 days/month of physiotherapy divided in 3 daily sessions. Clinical data were collected at the beginning, at the end, and at 90 days follow-up. BDNF serum levels were detected by ELISA at 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 90 days. The follow-up period had a duration of 60 days (T30-T90). The results showed that at the end of the treatment (day 30), an improvement in extrapyramidal signs (UPDRS III; UPDRS III - Gait and Balance items), motor (6 Minute Walking Test), and daily living activities (UPDRS II; PDQ-39) was observed. BDNF levels were increased at day 7 as compared with baseline. After that, no changes in BDNF were observed during the treatment and in the successive follow-up. This study demonstrates that motor rehabilitation training is able to ameliorate PD symptoms and to increase temporarily BDNF serum levels. The latter effect may potentially contribute to the therapeutic action.

Angelucci, F., Piermaria, J., Gelfo, F., Shofany, J., Tramontano, M., Fiore, M., et al. (2016). The effects of motor rehabilitation training on clinical symptoms and serum BDNF levels in Parkinson’s disease subjects. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY, 94(4), 455-461 [10.1139/cjpp-2015-0322].

The effects of motor rehabilitation training on clinical symptoms and serum BDNF levels in Parkinson’s disease subjects

CALTAGIRONE, CARLO;
2016

Abstract

Increasing evidence suggests that motor rehabilitation may delay Parkinson's disease (PD) progression. Moreover, parallel treatments in animals up-regulate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Thus, we investigated the effect of a motor rehabilitation protocol on PD symptoms and BDNF serum levels. Motor rehabilitation training consisted of a cycle of 20 days/month of physiotherapy divided in 3 daily sessions. Clinical data were collected at the beginning, at the end, and at 90 days follow-up. BDNF serum levels were detected by ELISA at 0, 7, 14, 21, 30, and 90 days. The follow-up period had a duration of 60 days (T30-T90). The results showed that at the end of the treatment (day 30), an improvement in extrapyramidal signs (UPDRS III; UPDRS III - Gait and Balance items), motor (6 Minute Walking Test), and daily living activities (UPDRS II; PDQ-39) was observed. BDNF levels were increased at day 7 as compared with baseline. After that, no changes in BDNF were observed during the treatment and in the successive follow-up. This study demonstrates that motor rehabilitation training is able to ameliorate PD symptoms and to increase temporarily BDNF serum levels. The latter effect may potentially contribute to the therapeutic action.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore MED/26 - Neurologia
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
BDNF; Parkinson’s disease; exercice physique; maladie de Parkinson; motor rehabilitation; physical exercise; rééducation motrice; Activities of Daily Living; Aged; Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; Female; Gait; Humans; Male; Middle Aged; Motor Activity; Parkinson Disease; Physical Therapy Modalities; Teaching; Up-Regulation
Angelucci, F., Piermaria, J., Gelfo, F., Shofany, J., Tramontano, M., Fiore, M., et al. (2016). The effects of motor rehabilitation training on clinical symptoms and serum BDNF levels in Parkinson’s disease subjects. CANADIAN JOURNAL OF PHYSIOLOGY AND PHARMACOLOGY, 94(4), 455-461 [10.1139/cjpp-2015-0322].
Angelucci, F; Piermaria, J; Gelfo, F; Shofany, J; Tramontano, M; Fiore, M; Caltagirone, C; Peppe, A
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/170823
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