BACKGROUND All known organisms develop and evolve in the presence of gravitational force, and it is evident that gravity has a significant influence on organism physiology and development. Microgravity is known to affect gene expression, enzyme activity, cytoskeleton organization, mitotic proliferation and intracellular signaling. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to study some aspects of the development in vitro of mouse embryonic testes in simulated microgravity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Testes from mouse embryos (12.5-16.5 days post coitum, d.p.c.) were cultured in simulated microgravity and standard static culture conditions. The microgravity condition was provided by a Rotary Cell Culture System (RWV) bioreactor, an apparatus designated for 3D tissue and small organ cultures. After 48 h of the culture in the RWV, testis morphology and size was evaluated. RESULTS: The first observation was that the culture in the RWV bioreactor had a beneficial effect on the testis growth and on the survival of germ cells in comparison to static 2D culture methods. Moreover, we found, that RWV culture caused disorganization the gonadal tissues, namely of the testis cords. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the maintenance of testis cord could be sensitive to microgravity. We hypothesize that while the effect on testis growth is due to a better nutrient and oxygen supply, the testis cord's disorganization might depend on the microgravity conditions simulated by the bioreactor. Considering the complexity of the processes involved in the formation of the testis cords and their dynamic changes during the embryo fetal period, further studies are needed to identify the causes of such effect.

Nowacki, D., Klinger, F.g., Mazur, G., & De Felici, M. (2015). Effect of culture in simulated microgravity on the development of mouse embryonic testes. ADVANCES IN CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, 24(5), 769-774 [10.17219/acem/27920].

Effect of culture in simulated microgravity on the development of mouse embryonic testes

KLINGER, FRANCESCA GIOIA;DE FELICI, MASSIMO
2015

Abstract

BACKGROUND All known organisms develop and evolve in the presence of gravitational force, and it is evident that gravity has a significant influence on organism physiology and development. Microgravity is known to affect gene expression, enzyme activity, cytoskeleton organization, mitotic proliferation and intracellular signaling. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to study some aspects of the development in vitro of mouse embryonic testes in simulated microgravity. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Testes from mouse embryos (12.5-16.5 days post coitum, d.p.c.) were cultured in simulated microgravity and standard static culture conditions. The microgravity condition was provided by a Rotary Cell Culture System (RWV) bioreactor, an apparatus designated for 3D tissue and small organ cultures. After 48 h of the culture in the RWV, testis morphology and size was evaluated. RESULTS: The first observation was that the culture in the RWV bioreactor had a beneficial effect on the testis growth and on the survival of germ cells in comparison to static 2D culture methods. Moreover, we found, that RWV culture caused disorganization the gonadal tissues, namely of the testis cords. CONCLUSIONS: The results suggest that the maintenance of testis cord could be sensitive to microgravity. We hypothesize that while the effect on testis growth is due to a better nutrient and oxygen supply, the testis cord's disorganization might depend on the microgravity conditions simulated by the bioreactor. Considering the complexity of the processes involved in the formation of the testis cords and their dynamic changes during the embryo fetal period, further studies are needed to identify the causes of such effect.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/17
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Nowacki, D., Klinger, F.g., Mazur, G., & De Felici, M. (2015). Effect of culture in simulated microgravity on the development of mouse embryonic testes. ADVANCES IN CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL MEDICINE, 24(5), 769-774 [10.17219/acem/27920].
Nowacki, D; Klinger, Fg; Mazur, G; DE FELICI, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/164360
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