Background: Aging is characterized by a physiological reduction in physical activity, which is inversely correlated with survival. Aims: Aim of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular, central hemodynamic and autonomic responses to a single bout of adapted physical exercise in octogenarian subjects. Methods: We studied cardiovascular, hemodynamic and autonomic responses to adapted physical activity in 33 subjects by a noninvasive methodology (Nexfin®, Edwards Lifesciences Corporation). Results: Our octogenarians presented a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (p < 0.01) and heart rate (p < 0.005) in response to exercise, while both are reduced during the early recovery phase. Central hemodynamic showed a significant increase in stroke volume (p < 0.05), cardiac output (p < 0.01) and left ventricle contractility index (p < 0.01), whereas systemic vascular resistance showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001). We found a reduction in baroreflex control of the sinus node during exercise. Discussion: Our data demonstrate that in very old people adapted physical activity is able to activate cardiovascular system and to induce a postexercise hypotension similarly to adults. The baroreflex control of sinus node seems to contribute in the physiological mechanism of these cardiovascular adaptations. Conclusions: In very old people, physical activity induces cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses not significantly different from those induced in adult even though some cautions particularly in the early recovery phase after exercise should be exercised.

Panzarino M1, 2., Gravina, A., Carosi, V., Crobeddu, P., Tiroli, A., Lombardi, V., et al. (2017). Cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to adapted physical exercises in very old adults. AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, 29(3), 419-426 [10.1007/s40520-016-0598-2].

Cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to adapted physical exercises in very old adults

GRAVINA, ANGELA;LOMBARDI, VALTER RUGGERO MARIA;D'OTTAVIO, STEFANO;GALANTE, ALBERTO;LEGRAMANTE, JACOPO MARIA
2017

Abstract

Background: Aging is characterized by a physiological reduction in physical activity, which is inversely correlated with survival. Aims: Aim of the present study is to evaluate the cardiovascular, central hemodynamic and autonomic responses to a single bout of adapted physical exercise in octogenarian subjects. Methods: We studied cardiovascular, hemodynamic and autonomic responses to adapted physical activity in 33 subjects by a noninvasive methodology (Nexfin®, Edwards Lifesciences Corporation). Results: Our octogenarians presented a significant increase in mean arterial pressure (p < 0.01) and heart rate (p < 0.005) in response to exercise, while both are reduced during the early recovery phase. Central hemodynamic showed a significant increase in stroke volume (p < 0.05), cardiac output (p < 0.01) and left ventricle contractility index (p < 0.01), whereas systemic vascular resistance showed a significant decrease (p < 0.001). We found a reduction in baroreflex control of the sinus node during exercise. Discussion: Our data demonstrate that in very old people adapted physical activity is able to activate cardiovascular system and to induce a postexercise hypotension similarly to adults. The baroreflex control of sinus node seems to contribute in the physiological mechanism of these cardiovascular adaptations. Conclusions: In very old people, physical activity induces cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses not significantly different from those induced in adult even though some cautions particularly in the early recovery phase after exercise should be exercised.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Sì, ma tipo non specificato
Settore M-EDF/02 - Metodi e Didattiche delle Attivita' Sportive
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Aging; Autonomic nervous system; Baroreceptors; Exercise; Hemodynamic;
Panzarino M1, 2., Gravina, A., Carosi, V., Crobeddu, P., Tiroli, A., Lombardi, V., et al. (2017). Cardiovascular and hemodynamic responses to adapted physical exercises in very old adults. AGING CLINICAL AND EXPERIMENTAL RESEARCH, 29(3), 419-426 [10.1007/s40520-016-0598-2].
Panzarino M1, 2; Gravina, A; Carosi, V; Crobeddu, P; Tiroli, A; Lombardi, Vrm; D'Ottavio, S; Galante, A; Legramante, Jm
Articolo su rivista
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/162637
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