The binding of nerve growth factor (NGF) to its receptors in PC12 cells was studied in two experimental conditions: (a) cell fixation with paraformaldehyde followed by permeabilization of the plasma membrane with methanol and (b) metabolic poisoning of living cells with sodium azide. Paraformaldehyde fixation of PC12 cells causes a 60-70% reduction of NGF binding capacity; the original binding capacity is restored following permeabilization with methanol. A kinetic analysis of NGF binding under these conditions reveals a single homogeneous population of receptors at variance with experiments performed in living cells where two kinetically distinct types of NGF receptors were demonstrated [Landreth, G. E. and Shooter, E. M. (1980) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 77, 4751-4755; Schechter, A. L. and Bothwell, M. A. (1981) Cell, 24, 867-874]. Our results suggest that a proportion of the NGF receptors in PC12 cells is hidden, i.e. not available for binding to the ligand, and in a dynamic equilibrium with exposed receptors. The existence of hidden receptors is confirmed by treatment of PC12 cells with sodium azide, which causes a 50% reduction in NGF binding capacity and protection from trypsin digestion of the remaining pool of hidden receptors. The latter become exposed at the cell surface following removal of sodium azide. Our data provide an interpretation for the as yet unsatisfactorily explained data on NGF receptors.

Cattaneo, A., Biocca, S., Nasi, S., Calissano, P. (1983). Hidden receptors for nerve growth factor in PC12 cells. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF BIOCHEMISTRY, 135(2), 285-290.

Hidden receptors for nerve growth factor in PC12 cells

BIOCCA, SILVIA;CALISSANO, PIETRO
1983-09-15

Abstract

The binding of nerve growth factor (NGF) to its receptors in PC12 cells was studied in two experimental conditions: (a) cell fixation with paraformaldehyde followed by permeabilization of the plasma membrane with methanol and (b) metabolic poisoning of living cells with sodium azide. Paraformaldehyde fixation of PC12 cells causes a 60-70% reduction of NGF binding capacity; the original binding capacity is restored following permeabilization with methanol. A kinetic analysis of NGF binding under these conditions reveals a single homogeneous population of receptors at variance with experiments performed in living cells where two kinetically distinct types of NGF receptors were demonstrated [Landreth, G. E. and Shooter, E. M. (1980) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA, 77, 4751-4755; Schechter, A. L. and Bothwell, M. A. (1981) Cell, 24, 867-874]. Our results suggest that a proportion of the NGF receptors in PC12 cells is hidden, i.e. not available for binding to the ligand, and in a dynamic equilibrium with exposed receptors. The existence of hidden receptors is confirmed by treatment of PC12 cells with sodium azide, which causes a 50% reduction in NGF binding capacity and protection from trypsin digestion of the remaining pool of hidden receptors. The latter become exposed at the cell surface following removal of sodium azide. Our data provide an interpretation for the as yet unsatisfactorily explained data on NGF receptors.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore BIO/12
Settore BIO/13
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
Cell Line; Fibroblasts; Glioma; Kinetics; Nerve Growth Factors; Pheochromocytoma; Receptors, Cell Surface; Receptors, Nerve Growth Factor; Solubility; Surface Properties; Trypsin
Cattaneo, A., Biocca, S., Nasi, S., Calissano, P. (1983). Hidden receptors for nerve growth factor in PC12 cells. EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF BIOCHEMISTRY, 135(2), 285-290.
Cattaneo, A; Biocca, S; Nasi, S; Calissano, P
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/2108/128130
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