Brazil has experienced one of the largest declines in child labor and increases in schooling observed in any country over a 25-year period. Within-industry differences in employment are the single most important factor in explaining this fall. These differences subsume changes in the supply of child labor induced by improvements in living standards and policy interventions. Results for urban areas show a smaller role of compositional changes in explaining differences in the incidence of child labor across states. This is consistent with our finding that urban children happen to be much more segregated in specific industries than rural children and that child intensive industries account for a small and essentially fixed share of adult employment in urban areas. An analysis of census data shows that, between 1980 and 2000, the incidence of child labor nationwide halves, falling from 23% to 11% for boys and from 10% to 6% for girls.

Manacorda, M., & Rosati, F.c. (2011). Industrial structure and child labor evidence from the Brazilian population census. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL CHANGE, 59(4), 753-776 [10.1086/660002].

Industrial structure and child labor evidence from the Brazilian population census

ROSATI, FURIO CAMILLO
2011

Abstract

Brazil has experienced one of the largest declines in child labor and increases in schooling observed in any country over a 25-year period. Within-industry differences in employment are the single most important factor in explaining this fall. These differences subsume changes in the supply of child labor induced by improvements in living standards and policy interventions. Results for urban areas show a smaller role of compositional changes in explaining differences in the incidence of child labor across states. This is consistent with our finding that urban children happen to be much more segregated in specific industries than rural children and that child intensive industries account for a small and essentially fixed share of adult employment in urban areas. An analysis of census data shows that, between 1980 and 2000, the incidence of child labor nationwide halves, falling from 23% to 11% for boys and from 10% to 6% for girls.
Pubblicato
Rilevanza internazionale
Articolo
Esperti anonimi
Settore SECS-P/01 - Economia Politica
English
Con Impact Factor ISI
census; child labor; employment; industrial structure; labor market; living standard; urban area
Manacorda, M., & Rosati, F.c. (2011). Industrial structure and child labor evidence from the Brazilian population census. ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT AND CULTURAL CHANGE, 59(4), 753-776 [10.1086/660002].
Manacorda, M; Rosati, Fc
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/2108/122949
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